FOXROCK LOCAL HISTORY CLUB – NEXT PUBLIC MEETING

NEXT PUBLIC MEETING OF THE FOXROCK LOCAL HISTORY CLUB

This will be held in the Foxrock Parish Pastoral Centre

@ 20:00 on Tuesday 16th January 2018

Main Talk – FROM 2RN TO RTE RADIO

by Harry Bradshaw

Harry, as a senior music producer in RTE Radio, has been involved in setting up the Irish Traditional Music Archives. He has been involved in collecting traditional music from the early days of radio to present. His knowledge of radio programmes from the early days of radio to the present will delight those who love the radio. From early battery radios to present digital radios we all have favourite programs and memories. Come a listen to the history of radio in Ireland.

2RN was the call sign of Ireland’s first national radio station when it began broadcasting from Dublin in January 1926. Over the following decades the name of the station changed to Radio Éireann, Radio Telefís Éireann and continues today as RTÉ Radio 1 and its associated stations.

This presentation will retrace 2RN’s start up and will deal with its progress to the 1970s with a selection of historic photographs of early studios and the broadcasters who were to become household names throughout Ireland. Extracts from a variety of programmes spanning those early years will also be heard and are sure to bring back memories.

SHORT TALK – The Great Influenza Pandemic of 1918.

By Pádraig Laffan

It is called the forgotten epidemic, or more correctly Pandemic and the numbers who died as a result of it are shocking, even to us today after all the carnage of the twentieth century, so much so that we might wonder was it really so bad or is this just the old story being hyped up on its  hundredth anniversary. If we look at the Irish newspapers in the height of the epidemic names like the Dardanelles, the Somme and the sinking of the Leinster ring down through history like icons for tales of human conflict. But the great flu of 1918 – probably spanning about two and a half years, killed many more than the Great War and indeed more than the next Great War.                        Quote from; Jeffery K. Taubenberger Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rockville, Maryland, USA and David M. Morens   National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

“An estimated one third of the world’s population (or ≈500 million persons) were infected and had clinically apparent illnesses during the 1918–1919 influenza pandemic. The disease was exceptionally severe.   Case-fatality rates were >2.5%, compared to <0.1% in other influenza pandemics Total deaths were estimated at ≈50 million and were arguably as high as 100 million.”

How did it start? How did it spread? what happened in Ireland?

 

 

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